Quick Answer: How do you use Vietnamese pronouns?

How do Vietnamese pronouns work?

The common canonical Vietnamese words for I – You are tôi, bạn, anh, chị, and em, etc. Other pronouns: He, She, We, They are built upon the words for I and You. In business settings, it’s polite to refer to your associates as anh and chị The way to say my in Vietnamese is belonging to me or of me.

How do you address a Vietnamese stranger?

If the person is younger than you, use em. If the person is a bit older than you, use anh for male and chị for female. If the person is about one generation older than you and is younger than your parents, use chú for male and cô for female.

Why do Vietnamese speak in third person?

As Vietnamese people often talk in the third person, a person’s “ranking” often becomes their identity in the context of family affairs, for example, a mother will refer to herself as me or ma (mum) when talking to her kids. This is helpful when meeting distant relatives you may or may not have met.

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What do Vietnamese call their mother?

Family words in Vietnamese

Vietnamese (tiếng việt)
parents bố mẹ [ 母], ba má
father cha [ ]; bố [ ] (NV); ba (SV)
mother mẹ [母] (NV); má (SV)
children con cái [ ]

How do you address yourself in Vietnamese?

Technically, you can address yourself as” tôi” and and your junior as “em”. But this pair of pronouns is way too formal and unusual, also rarely used. “Tao” for yourself and “mày” for your junior: Please don’t go for this one, because it is very rude. This one is just applied for the ones that is very close to you.

How do you address yourself to a teacher in Vietnamese?

If your teacher is not so much older than you, your teacher may address you as ‘anh’ or ‘chị’. You could perhaps use ‘tôi’ but in the south it’s most common to use the more informal ‘tui’. If your teacher is a similar age to or younger than you, you should still address your teacher as cô or thầy out of respect.

How do you greet an aunt in Vietnamese?

Chào chú / Chào cô

In a Vietnamese family, chú is used to call an uncle. Chào cô is often used when you need to greet someone who is old enough to be your “aunt”. In another word, use chào cô to greet a woman who is in the same generation as your parents. In a Vietnamese family, cô is used to call an aunt.

How do Vietnamese call each other?

Vietnamese people generally address one another by their given (personal) name in any casual context. … An older person addresses non-elderly men and women as ‘Anh’ (older brother) and ‘Chi’ (older sister) respectively, and very young or unmarried men and women as ‘Chu’ (younger brother) and ‘Co’ (younger sister).

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What do Vietnamese call their siblings?

Kinship terms

Term Reciprocal Literal meaning
anh em older brother
chị em older sister
em anh or chị younger sibling
con cha, mẹ, bà, etc. biological child or grandchild

What are common Vietnamese names?

The most common are Le, Pham, Tran, Ngo, Vu, Do, Dao, Duong, Dang, Dinh, Hoang and Nguyen – the Vietnamese equivalent of Smith. About 50 percent of Vietnamese have the family name Nguyen. The given name, which appears last, is the name used to address someone, preceded by the appropriate title.

How do you address a Vietnamese family?

How Do You Call Family Members In Vietnamese?

  1. Parents: Cha mẹ
  2. Father: Cha, bố/thầy (NV), bọ (CV), ba/tía (SV)
  3. Mother: Mẹ, u (NV), mạ/mệ (CV), má (SV)
  4. Daughter: Con gái.
  5. Son: Con trai.
  6. Older sister: Chị gái.
  7. Younger sister: Em gái.
  8. Older brother: Anh trai.

What do Vietnamese call their dad?

Vietnam. In Vietnam, each region has its own ways to say “Father”. Traditionally, fathers were at the top of the Vietnamese family hierarchy so children usually called them “Thầy” or “Cậu” to show the utmost respect. Nowadays, “Bố” and “Ba” are the two most common words for father using everywhere in Vietnam.

How do you say dad in Thai?

The point is, there is a lot of respect for parents in Thai culture. When addressing parents, you can use the word ‘mae’ (แม่) for mother/mom, and the word ‘phaw’ (พ่อ) for father/dad.